Silje Nes

Selected work

Inner Workings

Mount Static

Room of Hidden Mountain

Morphogenesis

Shadows
Mirrored / Mirror
Schwierigkeiten beim Schweben
Move Nimbly with Light Rapid Steps
Schaperstraße 24 



Music

About





2019
Sept 7

Kunstnernes Hus, Oslo. Live performance, Opening of Høstutstillingen 

Aug 28
BEK, Bergen. Live performance

June 14–26
BCMA, Berlin. The Moment before Falling, the Time in Between (with Katrin Caspar)

Jan 22–27
TITANIC, Turku, FI. Schaperstraße 24 (with Jessica Ekomane)


Mark





Morphogenesis



Copper wire, 4 channe audio, 4 speaker elements, 2 piezo microphones, Max/MSP patch

Morphogenesis begins with the creation of a copper structure – a monotonous process of addition to an expanding net of metal. The material is a spiral of cells, layers of rows grow outward, each new cell depending on the previous one for the next to be created. It is crocheted from 5 kilos of copper wire. The wire originates from Bundeswehr stockpiles, where it was used for cable harnesses in airplanes.
          Once it has reached its full size, it starts working by itself, forming cycles, now in the form of sound waves. Its language is sub-sonic sound, imperceivable to the human ear. Stripped of its audible attributes, in Morphogenesis the sound waves are reduced to their mechanical movement, discernable only to the human eye. The speakers also carry the sound signals picked up by transducers attached to the copper body. Morphogenesis self-monitors its own behavior, seeking order by adjusting its movement accordingly.
          Morphogenesis can and will be many things at once. It is a single structure consisting of one string organized into a single whole. It is a multiplicity of centres formed from the small independent cells of the structure, intermittantly emphasized by the constantly changing movement of matter.

Morphogenesis (2015)
Kühlhaus, Berlin
Shedhalle, Tübingen

Morphogenesis II. Matter, electric (2016)
Quiet Cue, Berlin

Morphogenesis III. 0 (2017)
Firstdraft, Sydney

            



Mark